Binoculars and baloons

Concert in Central Park - 2001


On July 10th, 2001, I continued my annual tradition of going to the NY Philharmonic's concert in Central Park. The solo violist was the famous Joshua Bell, but what I remember the most was the conductor, William Eddins from Buffalo ("the other New York", as he called it). His singular role as emcee-cum-DJ-cum-conductor was most amusing. Sitting in the audience, one could hear the purists wince. Ah joy.

Camera and binoculars Looking south
Sea of people Standing man
Fireworks and stage


And below are some notes and some pictures from my visit to the CP concert two years ago. I keep these for historical reasons, but also to see how my pictures from two years ago (when I'd just started photography) differ from those I take now.


From 1999:

On July 20th 1999, I continued my annual tradition of attending the New York Philharmonic's concerts in Central Park every summer.

I usually go very early, so I get to see all the people who make it into a picnic. Although the acoustics mostly suck (to be fair, one really cannot expect good acoustics in an open arena), the concert is still very relaxing -- I think it has to do with the ambience of the great lawn, and the music that they choose to play, which tends to be mostly impressionistic.

Before the concert During the concert
Fireworks Still more...
More fireworks Still more fireworks

And this year I had taken my fully manual Minolta Hi-Matic camera with me, along with a tripod and cable release. The advantage of a manual camera is that you can open out the exposure for several seconds, which is what needs to be done to take pictures of fireworks. The things going against me were: (a) my Minolta has a 40mm lens, (b) there were people standing right in front of me blocking the view, and (c) the fireworks that happened were relatively tinny.

But still, I am very satisfied with the photos. At least I've confirmed that my technique is correct. Next time, I need to (a) use a longer lens, (b) find a better spot and (c) use slower film.